Archive for April, 2014

Phipps and Murdock co-author journal article about snow climbing, mountaineering technique

From left, Maurice Phipps and Todd Murdock lead a 2008 snow climbing trip with WCU students to Grand Teton National Park.

From left, Maurice Phipps and Todd Murdock participate in a 2008 snow climbing trip with WCU students to Grand Teton National Park.

The Journal of Outdoor Recreation, Education and Leadership recently published an article co-authored by Maurice Phipps, professor of parks and recreation management, and Todd Murdock, director of Project Discovery, titled “Paul Petzoldt’s Sliding Middleman Snow Technique.”

The article details and clarifies how to execute an underutilized technique developed by Paul Petzoldt as a method for quickly traversing snow slopes with protection that requires little rope handling. The technique’s benefits include keeping hands drier and warmer, and saving energy.

“We have used this technique with groups of university students over the years in spring mountaineering conditions,” said Phipps and Murdock in the journal article. “We found it to be very effective and far safer than relying only on ice axe arrests for rope teams.”

Garcia-Castanon presents Spanish translation of American songs in Spain

Santiago Garcia-Castanon stands with his translation of all four stanzas of the poem by Francis Scott Key that became the lyrics of the national anthem of the United States. The translation is on exhibit at the Archivo Historico in Aviles, Spain.

Santiago Garcia-Castanon stands with his translation of all four stanzas of the poem by Francis Scott Key that became the lyrics of the national anthem of the United States. The translation is on exhibit at the Archivo Historico in Aviles, Spain.

Santiago Garcia-Castanon, professor of Spanish, recently traveled to Spain to present his Spanish translations of early American songs such as “The Star-Spangled Banner” in front of an audience that included a delegation of United States politicians, business leaders and diplomats.

The presentation was part of his collaborative work with a research group that includes Kevin Kelly, a musicologist from the University of Georgia; Laura Nannette Mosley, an instructor of Romance languages at the University of Georgia; and Javier Menendez, a Spanish librarian specializing in old books.

The songs Garcia-Castanon translated are included in “The Yankee Songster’s Pocket Companion,” a rare volume published in 1824. Only three copies of the book are known to exist – two in university libraries in the United States and the third in a library in Spain.

One of the songs included in the volume is “The Star-Spangled Banner” by Francis Scott Key, which later became the U.S. national anthem. While the original poem by Key has four stanzas, only one is usually performed as the national anthem. Garcia-Castanon’s translation of the complete poem was well-received and garnered media attention.

Garcia-Castanon also recently published an article, “Don Quixote and the Ethics of Power,” in the Annals of the University of Craiova (Romania).

Wright edits book about Coetzee

Laura Wright

Laura Wright

Laura Wright, associate professor and head of the Department of English, served as the lead editor of “Approaches to Teaching Coetzee’s ‘Disgrace’ and Other Works,” which will be released in May by the Modern Language Association of America.

The book, part of MLA’s Approaches to Teaching World Literature series, offers teaching tools ranging from multimedia materials to online resources as well as essays for instructors.

Coetzee, a South African writer who won global recognition and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2003, explores race, aging, gender, animal rights, power, violence, colonial history and accountability, the silent or silenced other, sympathy and forgiveness in his work.

Spanish faculty present in Colombia

Alberto Centeno-Pulido, assistant professor of Spanish; Santiago Garcia-Castanon, professor of Spanish; and Lori Oxford, associate professor of Spanish; participated in the XIII Congreso Internacional de Literatura Hispanica in Cartagena, Colombia, in March. Centeno-Pulido made a presentation about Argentinian-American singer-songwriter Kevin Johansen. Oxford spoke about a novel by contemporary Cuban novelist Pedro Juan Gutierrez. Garcia-Castanon shared his work on Spaniards in the Far East in the 1600s.

Kossick is featured speaker at continuing medical education seminar

Dr. Mark A. Kossick, professor of nursing and graduate anesthesia simulation coordinator, recently presented a comprehensive eight-hour electrocardiogram seminar to an international audience that included participants from Hawaii and Australia. The meeting was sponsored by A. Webb Roberts Center for Continuing Medical Education of Baylor Health Care System in Dallas and Northwest Anesthesia Seminars in Pasco, Washington. Kossick’s lectures were given on April 14 in Las Vegas and attended by anesthesiologists, internal medicine physicians and nurse anesthetists.

Lehman presents at regional conference

Will Lehman, associate professor of German and Spanish and head of the Department of Modern Foreign Languages, presented “Flipping the Language Classroom: Opportunities and Obstacles” at the Southeast Conference for Languages, Literatures and Film in Tampa, Florida, in February.

Tate named secretary of state association

Teresa Killian Tate, public communications specialist in the Office of Communications and Public Relations, recently was elected secretary of the College News Association of the Carolinas. The organization’s members are public relations, communications, media relations, marketing, writing, graphic design and web design professionals at institutions of higher education in North and South Carolina

WCU conserves energy but loses ‘Battle of the Plug’

Western Carolina University saved more than $12,000 in energy costs during the three-week 2014 Battle of the Plug energy conservation competition with Appalachian State University. But the 13.7 reduction in energy usage was not enough to beat ASU’s 17.5 percent during the third annual competition.

“We reached double-digit reductions and this is an impressive accomplishment all of us should be proud of,” said Lauren Bishop, chief sustainability officer at WCU.

In the WCU internal campus competition, Reynolds Residence Hall emerged as WCU’s 2014 Battle of the Plug Energy Champion with a 35.2 percent reduction in energy usage. More results are posted online at buildingdashboard.net/wcu/#/wcu/.

Dozens of student volunteers assist with inaugural bicycle rodeo event

WCU student Troy Adams (right) shows a bicycle rodeo participant how to navigate through an obstacle course. (Photo by and courtesy William Buddenberg)

WCU student Troy Adams (right) shows a bicycle rodeo participant how to navigate through an obstacle course. (Photo by and courtesy of WCU student William Buddenberg)

About 100 people including 43 community children participated in a bicycle rodeo April 27 sponsored by Western Carolina University’s Office of Career Services.

The event, held at the Jackson County Recreation Park in Cullowhee, featured safety information, bicycle and helmet inspections, a skills course for children learning how to ride bicycles and an off-road skills course for young riders with more experience. In addition, the rodeo included a group ride for children and their parents and a presentation for parents on how to teach children to ride without training wheels.

Michael Despeaux, associate director of career services and cooperative education, said his involvement coordinating the bicycle rodeo was seeded by an interest in finding a way to make biking more fun for his sons and their friends.

“The event quickly grew into a community initiative that brought an amazing array of partner organizations, parents and kids together for a good time centered around cycling, safety, physical activity, outdoor sport and fun,” said Despeaux.

Partners in the event were Nantahala Area Chapter of the Southern Off-Road Bicycle Association; WCU’s Base Camp Cullowhee; Jackson County Parks and Recreation Department; Motion Makers Bicycle Shop; N.C. Department of Transportation; Southwestern Commission; Jackson County 4H; the WCU Police Department; and the WCU Bicycle Racing Team.

Bicycle rodeo participants practiced making tight turns during a game in which they rode bicycles inside a rope circle.

Bicycle rodeo participants practiced making tight turns during a game in which they rode bicycles inside a rope circle. (Photo by and courtesy of WCU student Wiliam Buddenberg)

The bicycle rodeo also served as an experiential lab for WCU students to apply skills and hone important competencies in a real setting, he said. More than three dozen WCU student volunteers assisted with the bicycle rodeo in ways that enabled them to apply what they were learning in physical education, sport marketing, emergency medical care, parks and recreation, graphic design and other areas.

Among them was a group of sport marketing students who not only helped promote the event at venues including the Greening Up the Mountains festival in Sylva and youth soccer games, but also helped administer a survey to gather feedback from participants after the bicycle rodeo, said Colleen K. Davis, a career graduate fellow working in the Office of Career Services who assisted with the event.

“Riding a bike is a sport that one can enjoy at any age and so it is beneficial for one to learn this skill for the sake of adopting a sustainable method of personal fitness or enjoying the outdoor terrain,” said Davis. “Most importantly, the kids had a great time, as evidenced by their big smiles at the finish.”

The bicycle rodeo logo and T-shirt was created by Tyann Stubbs, a WCU student studying graphic design.

The bicycle rodeo logo and T-shirt was created by Tyann Stubbs, a WCU student studying graphic design.

Despeaux said event partners have expressed interest in hosting another bicycle rodeo in the future. He also said building enthusiasm for cycling and safety aligns with planned and recently opened cycling amenities in the community.

“The bicycle rodeo positively influenced Jackson County children and, in concert with the planned greenway and the new WCU trail, could help launch a cycling culture that will put Cullowhee on a new kind of map,” said Despeaux.

Students, Asheville Symphony musicians to perform together May 1

Western Carolina University music students and Asheville Symphony Orchestra string musicians will perform together at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 1, in the John W. Bardo Fine and Performing Arts Center on campus.

Michael Lancaster conducts the WCU University Chorus and Concert Choir in a performance earlier this academic year.

Michael Lancaster conducts the WCU University Chorus and Concert Choir in a performance earlier this academic year.

The event is the final concert of the academic year through WCU’s Artist-in-Residence Program, which brings professional musicians to campus to join WCU students and faculty members in concert. The series is completing its second year.

Michael Lancaster, director of the WCU Concert Choir and University Chorus, will conduct the concert. Both the Concert Choir and University Chorus will be featured in the performance, along with the Western Carolina Community Chorus, directed by Robert Holquist, retired member of the WCU music faculty.

The program will consist of “Te Deum” and “Lord Nelson Mass,” both by Franz Joseph Haydn.

A reception will be held in the lobby of the Bardo Arts Center immediately following the concert, with special recognition for recipients of the School of Music Distinguished Alumni and Distinguished Service awards.

Tickets for the concert are $10 for all adults, and $5 for students and children. Proceeds go to support the Artist-in-Residence Program.

The program represents a unique partnership between the School of Music and the Asheville Symphony Orchestra, providing important educational opportunities for School of Music students and more employment opportunities for the musicians of the orchestra, said Will Peebles, director of the WCU School of Music.

For tickets, call the Bardo Arts Center box office at 828-227-2479.

Faculty and staff honored at 2014 awards event

Western Carolina University celebrated employee excellence and achievements during the 2013-14 academic year at the annual spring Faculty and Staff Excellence Awards ceremony Friday, April 25.

Spring commencement ceremonies set for May 9-10

WCU will hold a trio of commencement ceremonies over a two-day period – Friday and Saturday, May 9-10 – to recognize the academic achievements of what is expected to be a record-breaking spring class.

Twelve students awarded scholarships from Curtis, Enid Meltzer endowment

Twelve of Western Carolina University’s top students in the College of Arts and Sciences are winners of merit-based scholarship awards from the Curtis and Enid Meltzer Endowed Scholarship Fund.

A video counseling faculty published with journal article garners 127,000 views

WCU faculty members who embedded a link to their video titled “How to Conduct a First Counseling Session: Treatment Fit” in a journal article say they expect – and hope – that the use of video in scholarly counseling journals will become increasingly common.

WCU celebrates 125th anniversary with luncheon

Western Carolina University was a “place of a great deal of culture, and it started a long, long time ago,” said Sara Sutton Madison, luncheon keynote speaker and an alumna with family ties to WCU’s founder and first students.

Lopez wins private enterprise education association’s top scholar award

Edward Lopez (left) receives the Distinguished Scholar Award  from Peter Boettke, president of the Association of Private Enterprise Education.

Edward Lopez (left) receives the Distinguished Scholar Award from Peter Boettke, president of the Association of Private Enterprise Education.

Edward J. Lopez, the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Capitalism at Western Carolina University, recently received the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Association of Private Enterprise Education.

The Distinguished Scholar Award is presented each year to a member of APEE who, over a sustained period of years, has made a significant contribution to the research and literature of free market economics, said J.R. Clark, secretary and treasurer of APEE, in announcing the honor.

“Recognizing that ideas which are not communicated are ideas which will have no impact, this award is presented to members who excel as thinkers and communicators,” Clark said. “The award represents those who, by the dint of rigorous research and clear thinking, have communicated to their colleagues in academe and the public in general the fundamental understandings of the market economy and the system of entrepreneurship which is integral to it.”

Lane authors article published by international museum profession blog

Anne T. Lane, an administrative support associate with the Mountain Heritage Center, authored an article titled “Give it a Rest – Thoughts on Exhibiting Light-sensitive Objects,” which was published in “Register Trek,” an international blog published in multiple languages about the museum profession. The article is available in English as well as Italian, Spanish and German.

Scifers wins athletic training honor

James Scifers, professor of athletic training at Western Carolina University, is recipient of the North Carolina Athletic Trainers’ Association Educator of the Year Award for 2014.

The award is given annually to an athletic training educator who demonstrates excellence in classroom and clinical education of students enrolled in a program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Scifers received the award at the association’s spring symposium and business meeting held in March in Wrightsville Beach.

Hartley presents at regional LGBT rights conference, participates in national advisory council meeting

Roger Hartley, director of the master’s degree program in public affairs and professor of political science and public affairs, recently presented “Rights Claims and Legal Opportunities After Windsor” at the conference LGBT in the South: Advocacy Within and Beyond the Law. The conference was attended by attorneys, organizers, ministers and community members. Hartley’s talk centered on the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision in 2013 to erase a portion of the Defense of Marriage Act.

Hartley also participated in a meeting of the Research Advisory Council of the National Center for State Courts.

Kossick lectures as a visiting professor at Lincoln Memorial University

Dr. Mark A. Kossick, professor of nursing and graduate nurse anesthesia simulation coordinator, presented seven lectures April 5 as a visiting professor at Lincoln Memorial University in Tennessee. Kossick served as the lecture faculty for a continuing education seminar titled “Implementing ECG Analysis Across the Continuum of Anesthesia Care.”

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